Lombard library puts up mural celebrating inclusion and diversity

  • Max Lindberg, with his mom, Megan, twin brother Major (in front), and sister Malena, pose in front of the mural by artist Alejandro Echavez celebrating the inclusion and representation of children of all abilities.

    Max Lindberg, with his mom, Megan, twin brother Major (in front), and sister Malena, pose in front of the mural by artist Alejandro Echavez celebrating the inclusion and representation of children of all abilities. Courtesy of Helen Plum Library

 
 
Posted10/10/2022 11:24 AM

The Make-A-Wish Foundation recently granted a wish for Max Lindberg to have a mural put up in the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago.

The mural, created by artist Alejandro Echavez, highlights the beauty of inclusion and representation for children of all abilities.

 

When the display wrapped outside the Shedd's Soundings Cafe, the mural was relocated to Helen Plum Library in Lombard.

Artist Alejandro Echavez's mural, inspired by Max Lindberg, is now on exhibit at Helen Plum Library in Lombard. In the spring, the Make a Wish Foundation had granted Max's wish to have a mural celebrating inclusion on display at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago.
Artist Alejandro Echavez's mural, inspired by Max Lindberg, is now on exhibit at Helen Plum Library in Lombard. In the spring, the Make a Wish Foundation had granted Max's wish to have a mural celebrating inclusion on display at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. - Courtesy of Helen Plum Library

A description posted next to the mural says "Disabled kids or kids with disabilities are smart, capable, full of adventure and imagination and are valued members of the community. Their lives are difficult and complicated, yet so hopeful and joyful."

On Sept. 29, the library celebrated the Lombard boy, who has cerebral palsy, and his mural with a storytime and snacks.

Nine-year-old Malena Lindberg and her brother Max, right, check out the children's book she wrote, encouraging readers to look beyond her brother's wheelchair and just say "Hi, Max."
Nine-year-old Malena Lindberg and her brother Max, right, check out the children's book she wrote, encouraging readers to look beyond her brother's wheelchair and just say "Hi, Max." - Courtesy of Helen Plum Library

Max's sister, 9-year-old Malena, wrote a children's book about her brother called "Hi, Max," which she read from at the event -- and even signed some copies for attendees who brought their books.

In her book: "Some people stare at Malena's brother, Max, who has cerebral palsy, and only see his differences. Malena wants to change the energy of those stares by sharing her love for Max and encouraging others to say, 'Hi Max,' with her."

You can place "Hi, Max" on hold at the library.

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