Roselle library hosts 'Telling A People's Story' featuring illustrated art in African-American children's books

  • Collage composed of the imagery found on the covers of African-American children's books featured in the "Telling A People's Story" exhibition currently on display at the Roselle Public Library.

    Collage composed of the imagery found on the covers of African-American children's books featured in the "Telling A People's Story" exhibition currently on display at the Roselle Public Library. Courtesy of Roselle Public Library District

  • "Telling A People's Story: African-American Children's Illustrated Literature" features 12 panels on milestones of African-American history represented by images in children's books.

    "Telling A People's Story: African-American Children's Illustrated Literature" features 12 panels on milestones of African-American history represented by images in children's books. Courtesy of Roselle Public Library

 
 
Updated 9/28/2020 6:52 PM

For the first time, African-American children's illustrated literature is the focus of an exhibition featuring art produced for book illustrations.

This presentation of the genre offers a lens into the cultural, historical, and social makeup of African-American cultural identity, while also shedding light on the long neglected world of African-American authors and illustrators in the pantheon of children's literature.

 

Roselle Public Library is proud to host this panel exhibition, "Telling A People's Story: African-American Children's Illustrated Literature."

This traveling panel exhibition includes imagery from works originally displayed in the 2018 museum exhibition at the Miami University Art Museum.

Twelve panels are installed throughout the library, 40 S. Park St.

Enjoy viewing this informative installation on your next visit to the library! View the exhibition through Oct. 31.

Events and milestones of African-American history are represented by images selected from paintings, pastels, drawings and mixed media works by African-American artists whose work was part of the original exhibition. The themes and time periods depicted in the panels include: "African Traditions and Storytelling," "The Middle Passage (1650s-1850s)," "Slavery & the Underground Railroad (1619-1865)," "Civil War, Emancipation & Reconstruction (1863-1877)," "Segregation (1860s-1960s)," "Harlem Renaissance & The Great Migration (1918-1924)," "The Civil Rights Era (1954-1968)," "The Civil Rights Era (1954-1968)," and "Modern Cultural Identity (1970s and beyond)."

Library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday; and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The first hour of every day is reserved for seniors and other at-risk patrons.

The Roselle Public Library District serves Roselle and parts of Schaumburg, Medinah, Keeneyville, and Bloomingdale.

For information, visit www.rosellepld.org or www.facebook.com/rosellepld/.

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