Prospect Heights Park District officials move on from defeat in referendum

  • Prospect Heights Park District officials say they will maintain current facilities at Lions Park, including the Gary Morava Recreation Center, with available resources after voters rejected a tax increase Tuesday for a major overhaul.

    Prospect Heights Park District officials say they will maintain current facilities at Lions Park, including the Gary Morava Recreation Center, with available resources after voters rejected a tax increase Tuesday for a major overhaul. Daily Herald File Photo, 2016

 
 
Posted11/11/2022 1:00 AM

After Prospect Heights Park District voters Tuesday rejected a $30 million bond issue to overhaul and improve facilities at Lions Park, district officials say they're committed to providing the best services possible with their available resources.

"The Prospect Heights Park District Board of Commissioners and staff are committed to serving the community," park board President Tim Jones said in a statement issued after about 57% voters rejected the tax-hike measure.

 

"Although the community did not approve the referendum, our goal is to continue providing quality recreation, fitness and leisure programs at the Gary Morava Recreation Center, the Lions Park Pool, Old Orchard Country Club and 14 park sites," he said.

Executive Director Christina Ferraro thanked the community for its involvement in the entire process, from participating in the surveys to sharing feedback on initial concepts

"We will continue to plan engaging and meaningful programs and classes for our community in 2023 and beyond while making the best use of our current facilities," she said.

Board members are scheduled to meet Tuesday, Nov. 15, when they may further address the referendum results.

The proposed project would have included replacing Lions Park pool and Gary Morava Recreation Center at 110 W. Camp McDonald Road, installing a new playground and sports courts, and doubling the parking.

The recreation center opened in 1976 and had an addition built in 1993.

Under the proposal, the owner of a median $284,300 house in the district would have paid an estimated $462 more per year in property taxes to the district for 25 years, officials said.

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