Historic bridge to make its return to Hidden Lake Forest Preserve in October

  • A wrought-iron bowstring pony truss bridge is being refurbished and will return in October to Hidden Lake Forest Preserve near Downers Grove.

    A wrought-iron bowstring pony truss bridge is being refurbished and will return in October to Hidden Lake Forest Preserve near Downers Grove. Courtesy of Forest Preserve District of DuPage County

 
 
Updated 10/1/2022 7:33 AM

A historic bridge will make its way back to Eagle Lake at Hidden Lake Forest Preserve near Downers Grove sometime in October.

The wrought-iron pony truss bridge, dating back to the 1870s, was lifted out with the use of a crane in June as part of a $1.37 million project to refurbish it and replace another bridge in the Hidden Lake Forest Preserve.

 

Since June, visitors have not been able to access the Eagle Lake Trail or Eagle Lake. The Loop Trail and Round Meadow Lake, however, have remained open.

Work on the historic bridge includes sandblasting, painting and other repairs. A new wooden deck will be installed once the bridge is back in place over the east branch of the DuPage River.

"We know this bridge is structurally sound," said Christopher Welch, a civil engineer for the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County. "The plans are for (to keep it) for another 100 years."

Although restoring the bridge will cost $20,000 to $30,000 more, officials said the bridge is expected to outlast a new bridge, which would have a life span of about 40 years.

by signing up you agree to our terms of service
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Welch said the bridge, which has been in Michigan for repairs, should make its return by the end of October. A crane will be used to put the bridge back in place in one piece.

Once the restored bridge is in place, work on a second bridge on the Loop Trail will begin. That 38-year-old bridge will be replaced with a standard 14-foot-wide steel truss bridge.

Welch anticipates all work will be completed by the end of the year.

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.