Robb Tadelman: 2022 candidate for McHenry County Sheriff

 
Updated 6/1/2022 10:44 AM

Bio

Party: Republican

 

Office sought: McHenry County Sheriff

City: Lake in the Hills

Age: 42

Occupation: Law Enforcement

Previous offices held: None

Q&A

Why are you running for this office? Is there a particular issue that motivates you?

For 18 years I have been honored to serve the community that I call home. I cannot think of a better way to continue to serve this great community than by being elected Sheriff. Over the past two years law enforcement has been a hot topic issue and the focal point of the media. It is time to restore faith and trust in the law enforcement profession. I have worked hard and tirelessly to assure the citizens needs of this county have been met by the McHenry County Sheriff's Office. As a son, brother, husband, father, and friend of people who live in this community, I am motivated to keep their rights protected and livelihood safe.

If you are an incumbent, describe two important initiatives you've led. If you're not an incumbent, describe two ways you would contribute to the position.

I feel that my experience and training makes me the best qualified candidate for this office. My experience has made me familiar with every department in not just the Sheriff's Office, but other elected offices as well as court and county administration. With this institutional knowledge, I will continue to work with members of the Courts, County Board, and Administration to assure the Sheriff's Office is servicing our community and our employees are given the training and tools to meet those needs.

I am immersed in the details of the operations of this office and ready and able to assume the role of Sheriff. We are experiencing a crisis in Mental Health right now that requires leaders from across the county to come together to serve those in need. I have already started this process with the Police Social Work Program through my ongoing involvement and connections with leaders of this county.

Are there enough deputies on the street and are they properly deployed? What changes would you make?

We are fortunate here in McHenry County because we have a Chairman, and a board that supports law enforcement and the needs of the Sheriff's office and it's public safety role. Like most law enforcement agencies we are experiencing a shortage of qualified recruits to fill deputy and correctional officer positions.

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Media and local legislature have demonized this honorable profession and the numbers of individuals who apply for jobs as deputies and correctional officers show it. To combat this, we have rebranded the Sheriff's Office through a new website, Sheriff's App (handheld device application), and more of a presence on social media. I have been working hard with other law enforcement leaders on promoting the law enforcement profession and finding new ways to get involved with members of our community to help promote a career in the first responder profession.

What role should the sheriff's department play in dealing with the county's opioid crisis?

The Opioid crisis is a state and national disaster. The McHenry County Sheriff's Office created and utilizes a drug induced homicide investigative protocol and have coordinated with state and federal law enforcement agencies to shut down the supply of these drugs. This is something I am very proud to have been a part of.

Agencies from around the country have contacted our department and adopted similar policies to address this crisis.

Our deputies are trained in the use of the anti-opioid treatment Narcan. The issue is complicated by the fact that part of the supply of these drugs has been created by prescription and other non-traditional criminal means. The unfortunate fact related to opioids is that they are deadly and highly addictive which means that most of the time we are at the tail end of the problem. The Sheriff's department can play a role in educating the public about the prevention and treatment of this addiction.

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