Mount Prospect makes moves on pedestrian bridge, train platform

  • Mount Prospect village trustees this week approved an engineering agreement that will push along plans to extend the train platform at the downtown Metra station. Officials say a longer platform will help reduce delays for vehicle drivers at the Route 83 rail crossing.

    Mount Prospect village trustees this week approved an engineering agreement that will push along plans to extend the train platform at the downtown Metra station. Officials say a longer platform will help reduce delays for vehicle drivers at the Route 83 rail crossing. Daily Herald File Photo

 
Updated 7/23/2020 11:37 AM

Mount Prospect trustees this week approved a pair of engineering agreements that will help push along two key projects: a pedestrian bridge spanning Northwest Highway and parallel railroad tracks to link Melas and Meadows parks, and the extension of the train platform at the downtown Metra station.

The cost will be $25,000 for the bridge and $100,000 for the platform, although Public Works Director Sean Dorsey said it could be lower because the latter project is eligible for grants.

 

"The goal behind that project is to extend the platform, get some of the morning inbound trains to stop further to the east and prevent it from keeping the gates down at (Route 83) while passengers are getting off and on board the train," Dorsey said.

Under the agreements, the Union Pacific Railroad will select and hire the consultants, while Mount Prospect will pay the bill.

Trustee William Grossi voted against the engineering deal for the pedestrian bridge, expressing concern that other local governments, such as the Arlington Heights and Mount Prospect park districts, have not signed on to the project.

"We have nobody else with us in it at this point," he said.

Trustee Colleen Saccotelli voted for the agreement, but echoed Grossi's concerns.

"I was a little perturbed as well that the other taxing bodies were not participating up until this point." She said. "But I think they need to see the project kind of fleshed out a little bit more to be involved, and so I think it's important to keep moving, since we've already invested the money in the engineering phase one study."

Dorsey said both the bridge and the platform will require an engineering review, since Union Pacific no longer performs that type of work in house.

"They've reorganized and cut back on staff, I believe," he said.

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