COVID-19, shootings: Is mass death now tolerated in America?

  • FILE - A person pays his respects at a makeshift memorial outside the scene of a shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., Sunday, May 15, 2022.

    FILE - A person pays his respects at a makeshift memorial outside the scene of a shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., Sunday, May 15, 2022. Associated Press

  • FILE - Garnell Whitfield Jr., left, the son of Ruth Whitfield, a victim of shooting at a supermarket, speaks with members of the media during a news conference in Buffalo, N.Y., Monday, May 16, 2022.  After a weekend of gun violence in America,  when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year.

    FILE - Garnell Whitfield Jr., left, the son of Ruth Whitfield, a victim of shooting at a supermarket, speaks with members of the media during a news conference in Buffalo, N.Y., Monday, May 16, 2022. After a weekend of gun violence in America, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year. Associated Press

  • FILE - Adam Almonte holds a photo of him with his older brother, Fernando Morales, on a bench where they used to sit and eat tuna sandwiches after playing catch in Fort Tryon Park in New York, Wednesday, March 16, 2022. Morales died April 7, 2020 from COVID-19 at age 43. After a weekend of gun violence in America, Saturday, May 14, 2022,  when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year.

    FILE - Adam Almonte holds a photo of him with his older brother, Fernando Morales, on a bench where they used to sit and eat tuna sandwiches after playing catch in Fort Tryon Park in New York, Wednesday, March 16, 2022. Morales died April 7, 2020 from COVID-19 at age 43. After a weekend of gun violence in America, Saturday, May 14, 2022, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year. Associated Press

  • FILE - This May 13, 2020 photo made with a fisheye lens shows a list of the confirmed COVID-19 cases in Salt Lake County early in the coronavirus pandemic at the Salt Lake County Health Department, in Salt Lake City.  After a weekend of gun violence in America, Saturday, May 14, 2022,  when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year.

    FILE - This May 13, 2020 photo made with a fisheye lens shows a list of the confirmed COVID-19 cases in Salt Lake County early in the coronavirus pandemic at the Salt Lake County Health Department, in Salt Lake City. After a weekend of gun violence in America, Saturday, May 14, 2022, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year. Associated Press

  • FILE - Frank Kulick, adjusts a display of wooden crosses, and a Jewish Star of David, representing the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, on his front lawn, Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, in Newtown, Conn.  After a weekend of gun violence in America, Saturday, May 14, 2022,  when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year.

    FILE - Frank Kulick, adjusts a display of wooden crosses, and a Jewish Star of David, representing the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, on his front lawn, Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, in Newtown, Conn. After a weekend of gun violence in America, Saturday, May 14, 2022, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year. Associated Press

  • FILE - Parents leave a staging area after being reunited with their children following a shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. where authorities say a gunman opened fire, leaving 27 people dead, including 20 children, Friday, Dec. 14, 2012. After a weekend of gun violence in America, Saturday, May 14, 2022,  when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year.

    FILE - Parents leave a staging area after being reunited with their children following a shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. where authorities say a gunman opened fire, leaving 27 people dead, including 20 children, Friday, Dec. 14, 2012. After a weekend of gun violence in America, Saturday, May 14, 2022, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year. Associated Press

  • FILE - Joanna Garcia, 47, leaves flowers outside Geneva Presbyterian Church to honor victims in Sunday's shooting at the church in Laguna Woods, Calif., Monday, May 16, 2022.  After a weekend of gun violence in America, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year.

    FILE - Joanna Garcia, 47, leaves flowers outside Geneva Presbyterian Church to honor victims in Sunday's shooting at the church in Laguna Woods, Calif., Monday, May 16, 2022. After a weekend of gun violence in America, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year. Associated Press

  • FILE - Orange County Sheriff's Sgt. Scott Steinle displays a photo of Dr. John Cheng, a 52-year-old victim who was killed in Sunday's shooting at Geneva Presbyterian Church, before a news conference in Santa Ana, Calif., Monday, May 16, 2022.  After a weekend of gun violence in America, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year.

    FILE - Orange County Sheriff's Sgt. Scott Steinle displays a photo of Dr. John Cheng, a 52-year-old victim who was killed in Sunday's shooting at Geneva Presbyterian Church, before a news conference in Santa Ana, Calif., Monday, May 16, 2022. After a weekend of gun violence in America, when shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number, once unthinkable, is now a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people a year. Associated Press

 
 
Updated 5/21/2022 7:32 AM

After mass shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19

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