Report details 'major failure' in Foxx's office's handling of first Smollett case

  • Actor Jussie Smollett, center, leaves the Leighton Criminal Courthouse on Thursday, Dec. 9, in Chicago, after a verdict in his trial. A judge said Monday a report detailing missteps and false statements made by prosecutors in the initial investigation of former "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett should be made public.

    Actor Jussie Smollett, center, leaves the Leighton Criminal Courthouse on Thursday, Dec. 9, in Chicago, after a verdict in his trial. A judge said Monday a report detailing missteps and false statements made by prosecutors in the initial investigation of former "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett should be made public. Associated Press, Dec. 9, 2021

  • Special prosecutor Dan Webb arrives Tuesday, Nov. 30, at the Leighton Criminal Courthouse for day two of Jussie Smollett's trial. A judge said Monday a report detailing missteps and false statements made by prosecutors in the initial investigation of former "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett should be made public.

    Special prosecutor Dan Webb arrives Tuesday, Nov. 30, at the Leighton Criminal Courthouse for day two of Jussie Smollett's trial. A judge said Monday a report detailing missteps and false statements made by prosecutors in the initial investigation of former "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett should be made public. Associated Press, Nov. 30, 2021

 
 
Updated 12/20/2021 7:59 PM

Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx and her top deputies repeatedly made procedural and ethical missteps as they mishandled the Jussie Smollett case, and then tried to mislead the public as the office struggled to respond to outrage over the decision to dismiss charges against the "Empire" actor, according to Special Prosecutor Dan Webb's full report.

Webb, who earlier this month led the prosecution team that saw Smollett convicted of lying to Chicago police about staging a 2019 hate crime, found no evidence of criminal conduct or influence peddling behind the controversial non-prosecution deal extended to the actor just weeks after his arrest.

 

But in the more than 60 pages summarizing interviews with current and former state's attorney's staff members and 100,000 pages of documents, Webb also offered little to explain how such a high-profile case nearly ended with the star's getting off with an unprecedented light slap on the wrist.

When interviewed by Webb's team, Foxx told investigators she herself was surprised by the deal made by her prosecutors and that Smollett was not going to be required to admit guilt or do community service after the charges were dropped.

For the complete story by the Chicago Sun-Times and more coverage, see chicago.suntimes.com.

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.