Breaking News Bar
posted: 8/12/2017 7:00 AM

Guam fliers offer emergency tips for threat from North Korea

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • A resident buys bottles of water at Home Depot in Guam Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The small U.S. territory of Guam has become a focal point after North Korea's army threatened to use ballistic missiles to create an "enveloping fire" around the island. The exclamation came after President Donald Trump warned Pyongyang of "fire and fury like the world has never seen."

    A resident buys bottles of water at Home Depot in Guam Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The small U.S. territory of Guam has become a focal point after North Korea's army threatened to use ballistic missiles to create an "enveloping fire" around the island. The exclamation came after President Donald Trump warned Pyongyang of "fire and fury like the world has never seen."
    Associated Press

  • Watch Room staff monitor news and updates and coordinate with agencies on local in an event of emergency Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017 as Guam Homeland Security opens its 24-hour Watch Room operation in response to the threats from North Korea, in Hagatna, Guam. Guam officials are disseminating fact sheets to help residents prepare for a possible missile attack from North Korea. Guam's Office of Civil Defense began distributing the guidance Friday, which includes tips on building an emergency supply kit, advice on staying put in concrete structures and reminders about keeping calm.

    Watch Room staff monitor news and updates and coordinate with agencies on local in an event of emergency Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017 as Guam Homeland Security opens its 24-hour Watch Room operation in response to the threats from North Korea, in Hagatna, Guam. Guam officials are disseminating fact sheets to help residents prepare for a possible missile attack from North Korea. Guam's Office of Civil Defense began distributing the guidance Friday, which includes tips on building an emergency supply kit, advice on staying put in concrete structures and reminders about keeping calm.
    Associated Press

  • Kenreen Atesof, right, a 16-year-old student in Hagatna village, hangs out at the beach with her family at Hagatna Bay, Guam, Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The small U.S. territory of Guam has become a focal point after North Korea's army threatened to use ballistic missiles to create an "enveloping fire" around the island. The exclamation came after President Donald Trump warned Pyongyang of "fire and fury like the world has never seen."

    Kenreen Atesof, right, a 16-year-old student in Hagatna village, hangs out at the beach with her family at Hagatna Bay, Guam, Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The small U.S. territory of Guam has become a focal point after North Korea's army threatened to use ballistic missiles to create an "enveloping fire" around the island. The exclamation came after President Donald Trump warned Pyongyang of "fire and fury like the world has never seen."
    Associated Press

  • A replica of canons used by the Spanish from the Spanish occupation on Guam in the 19th century is seen outside of government offices in Hagatna, Guam on Friday morning, Aug. 11, 2017. The small U.S. territory of Guam has become a focal point after North Korea's army threatened to use ballistic missiles to create an "enveloping fire" around the island. The exclamation came after President Donald Trump warned Pyongyang of "fire and fury like the world has never seen."

    A replica of canons used by the Spanish from the Spanish occupation on Guam in the 19th century is seen outside of government offices in Hagatna, Guam on Friday morning, Aug. 11, 2017. The small U.S. territory of Guam has become a focal point after North Korea's army threatened to use ballistic missiles to create an "enveloping fire" around the island. The exclamation came after President Donald Trump warned Pyongyang of "fire and fury like the world has never seen."
    Associated Press

  • In this Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, file photo, a family plays in the sand in Tumon, Guam. Threatening to fire a volley of missiles toward a major U.S. military hub _ and the home to 160,000 American civilians _ may seem like a pretty bad move for a country that is seriously outgunned and has an awful lot to lose. But pushing the envelope, or just threatening to do so, is what North Korea does best.

    In this Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, file photo, a family plays in the sand in Tumon, Guam. Threatening to fire a volley of missiles toward a major U.S. military hub _ and the home to 160,000 American civilians _ may seem like a pretty bad move for a country that is seriously outgunned and has an awful lot to lose. But pushing the envelope, or just threatening to do so, is what North Korea does best.
    Associated Press

 
 

If an attack warning is issued, Guam residents should take cover quickly - in a concrete structure, preferably underground - and stay there until instructed otherwise, according to a fact sheet titled "Preparing for an Imminent Missile Threat."

Guam's Office of Civil Defense began disseminating fact sheets Friday to help residents prepare for a missile attack from North Korea. The guidance includes tips on building an emergency kit, advice on staying put in concrete or brick structures, and reminders about keeping calm.

"Do not look at the flash or fireball - it can blind you," the missile threat prep fact sheet advises those who are caught outside. "Lie flat on the ground and cover your head."

The flier also offers guidance on removing radioactive material: "When possible, take a shower with lots of soap and water to help remove radioactive contamination." But don't scratch or scrub skin and "do not use conditioner in your hair because it will bind radioactive material to your hair."

Officials haven't raised the U.S. territory's threat level even after Pyongyang laid out plans to strike near the island in the coming weeks, Guam Gov. Eddie Calvo said. He noted that Guam has many buildings made to withstand powerful typhoons, yet he acknowledged that nothing can protect against a thermonuclear attack.

President Donald Trump assured Calvo that Guam is safe during a phone call. "We are with you a thousand percent," Trump said, according to video of the call posted on Calvo's Facebook page. "You are safe."

Calvo responded by saying he feels safe and confident with Trump's leadership: "I'm glad you're holding the helm, sir."

The fact sheets didn't seem to cause any widespread anxiety or affect day-to-day Guam life. Some people wondered about finding plastic sheeting, as one of the fliers recommends using duct tape and plastic sheeting "to seal all cracks around the door and any vents into the room."

___

Kelleher reported from Honolulu.

Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.